Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Pinky on the Brain

It's a gray Tuesday roundabout Exit 151. I used to think days like this were just overcast – thanks to Haze Cam Newark, I now know that much of the grayness actually is from elevated levels of air pollution (!). At least I have an FO to brighten the day, a short scarf (with marshmallow bunnies).

Taiyo scarf

While looking for something else at Needlecraftique (Exit 151), I [cough] just happened to notice the basket of Noro Taiyo, looking fresh as spring. New Noro! No surprise, I danced the happy dance went home with a skein, colorway 4.

Taiyo

Because I know Noro, I rewound the 100-gram, 200-meter center-pull skein and found – yup – a knot that disrupted the color sequence. Were it not for the knot, it looks like there would be 1½ color repeats. As it is, I have three repeats of the girliest colors in the colorway, which isn't so bad.

Rewound skein

During the Oscars show, the larger portion turned into the scarf – moss stitch with slip stitch borders, no fringe. Nice production knitting, something simple to showcase the brilliant colors and wabi-sabi-ness of the yarn. The scarf is 5 inches wide by 48 inches long (12 x 122 cm), just long enough to knot and tuck. (There's enough yarn left to make it a foot (30 cm) longer, if desired.) Here it is in futomaki view.

Scarf in futomaki view

And here's some futomaki, for gentle readers who don't know sushi.

Futomaki

Taiyo is fabulous – 40% cotton, 30% silk, 15% wool, 15% nylon – very like a cotton-silk version of Kureyon, except perhaps a bit more smoothly spun. Noro fans will love its mix of brilliant colors, rustic texture, luster, and strength. In the course of working out the dimensions of the scarf, I knit and frogged several times with no noticeable frizzing. As is to be expected, the yarn has considerable grab; I used aluminum needles. The wool and nylon content keep the yarn light and hopefully will reduce the tendency of cotton and silk to sag and bag.

Stitch detail

I love my new scarf and am very happy with the new yarn. It remains to be seen how it wears, but at the moment I could see it easily substituting for Kureyon or Silk Garden in projects such as the Brooklyn Tweed Noro Striped Scarf, Argosy, Klaralund, or Poppy, to name just a few.

10 comments:

Jeanne said...

Very pretty - love the colors. I'll have to keep my eye out for the yarn!

Bezzie said...

I love the very sushi-y colors that skein has too. Very nice!

Thanks for the link to hazcam..very cool! (in an uncool pollution way...)

bookwoman said...

I love the greens in there. With that fiber content, I'm guessing it's a pretty soft yarn? That's one thing that's always scared me off from most Noros. The ones I've felt always seem to be that scratchy wool I was afraid of as a kid.

Kim said...

New Noro! Woo hoo! I just love those pretty girly sushi colors. A good antidote to the gray bleary weather.

Jessica said...

Fantastic colors and a great FO! Did you make the sushi yourself?

Ina said...

Bookwoman: Taiyo is more neck-friendly than many Noros. Although many Noros that seem wiry in the skein soften when knit, washed, and worn.

CrazyFiberLady said...

Oooo pretty! I know someone who would have loved the bonus girly colors. Mmmm now I want sushi :)

Calling on Kahlo said...

I love it! I stopped by Connie's and oggled it, it is dreamy.

Devorah said...

Very pretty! Smart move, rewinding the ball. I'm not sure I would learn that well.

Deborah said...

I 'snuck' out of the house today and drove to Modern Yarn for buttons. I "overheard" a conversation between two other customers about your Nora travails.

Interweave Knits should start a "page 6" of such misadventures and blog laments - no?